CBD Explained

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a chemical compound that comes from the hemp plant. It is one of over 85 unique compounds found in hemp, known as cannabinoids. While its exact benefits and effects are still being researched, it is interesting to note that the United States Department of Health and Human Services holds a patent titled ‘Cannabinoids as Antioxidants and Neuroprotectants’, which claims that:

 “Nonpsychoactive cannabinoids, such as cannabidiol, are particularly advantageous to use because they avoid toxicity that is encountered with psychoactive cannabinoids at high doses useful in the method of the present invention.”

Cannabinoids, which can be either consumed (phytocannabinoids) or produced naturally by the body (endocannabinoid), are chemical compounds that interact with the body’s central regulatory system (the endocannabinoid system). This system is known to manage homeostasis and affect bodily processes such as appetite, mood and sleep. CBD is an example of a phytocannabinoid. Although our bodies can naturally produce its own endocannabinoids that bind to cannabinoid receptors in both the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system, phytocannabinoids help to kickstart our central regulatory system and provide powerful benefits

Where does CBD come from

CBD is extracted and separated from specific varieties of cannabis. It is the second most abundant compound in cannabis, typically representing up to 40% of its extracts. CBD is a compound that can be found in both psychoactive cannabis (marijuana) and non-psychoactive cannabis (hemp). However, most legal CBD products that you find on the market will be extracts from hemp. In contrast to marijuana, federal law allows for the cultivation, processing and marketing of hemp and hemp products, which would include cannabinoids derived from industrial hemp. Passed by Congress and signed into law by the President in 2014, the Farm Bill permits the growth and cultivation of industrial hemp in states where hemp is legal to grow. (Section 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014)

How does CBD work

Our body’s endocannabinoid system was found to be directly involved in the processes that keep our bodies balanced day to day, including: appetite, pain sensation, mood, memory, immune system functions, and inflammation control. Essentially, the system helps to manage homeostasis, balancing our body’s natural conditions. This system is made up of CB1 and CB2 receptors that are located in the brain and nervous systems throughout the body. The body creates its own cannabinoids, called endocannabinoids, to help support this regulatory system. CBD supplements these naturally created endocannabinoids to keep the receptors working at optimal capacity. Similar to how we use vitamin C to kick start our immune system, CBD acts as a kick starter to help the functions of the body’s central regulatory system. 

Your body actually has areas that are made specifically for cannabinoids — they are called cannabinoid receptor sites, and cannabinoids bind to theses receptors on your cells. Certain receptors are heavily concentrated in the central nervous system while others are found in almost every organ of the body. Cannabinoid receptors are found in the skin, digestive tract, and even in the reproductive organs. 
 
These sites make up the endocannabinoid system, which is responsible for numerous physiological and mental processes that occur naturally within the body. 
 
These receptors fall into two types: CB1 and CB2. CB1 receptors are found mainly in the brain (but also in the liver, kidneys, and lungs), while CB2 receptors are found mainly in the immune system. 
 
Also, since people often take numerous different cannabinoids together (for example, using medical marijuana), it is hard to attribute specific effects to specific cannabinoids. That’s because unprocessed cannabis includes more than 60 different types of cannabinoids, including CBD and THC. 
 
In addition, some cannabinoids interact synergistically, producing unique effects that are not found when using them individually. For example, CBD inhibits THC’s psychotropic effects when the two are taken together. However, CBD does this (and produces many other effects) without directly interacting with the cannabinoid receptors. At first, scientists thought there was a third type of CBD receptor just for Cannabidiol, but the answer was far more interesting and revealing. 
 
CBD is fairly unique as far as cannabinoids go, because it does not seem to interact directly with either the CB1 or CB2 receptors. So what does it do if it’s not interacting directly with our receptors? 
 
Here’s where it gets good… Cannabidiol has a particularly low potential for binding with the CB1 and CB2 receptors, but instead acts as an antagonist of the receptors’ agonists. That’s a mouthful. In layman’s terms, this means that CBD keeps the receptors working at optimal capacity and helps the function of all other cannabinoids, including the body’s own endocannabinoids. The indirect interactions of CBD with the endocannabinoid system has many effects, some of which surprised scientists and are still being researched. 
 
Some of CBD’s functions include:

✓ Effectively increases CB1 density, amplifying the effects of all cannabinoids that bind to CB1 receptors.

✓ Acts as a 5-HT1a receptor agonist in the brain. This means that CBD has calming and soothing effects such as some potent analgesics, but without the side effects.

✓ Acts as inverse agonist of CB2 receptors, effectively reducing the effects of cannabinoids that make CB2 receptors less responsive.

✓ Acts as an antagonist for the putative GPR55 receptor, an element of the endocannabinoid system that is still being researched. (It is suggested that GPR55 may be a third type of cannabinoid receptor altogether.) 
 
Between the above functions, most of CBD’s observed effects are well explained. However, scientists are still unclear about how some effects of Cannabidiol are actually occurring. The most possible explanation is via the hypothetical GPR55 receptor, or through more indirect and synergistic effects that still await discovery. 
 
The indirect nature of CBD’s effects have made it difficult for scientists to pinpoint its exact effects up to now, but many positive effects of this unusual phytocannabinoid are still being studied. 
 
The endocannabinoid system is closely interconnected with the nervous and immune system. Since CBD has been shown to boost just about every function of our cannabinoid receptors, it is proven to have far-reaching soothing and relaxing effects. 
 
The ECS as the greatest neurotransmitter system in the body. It lends a hand in seemingly just about everything, including: 
 
•mood •memory •motor control •immune function •pain perception •appetite •sleep •reproduction •bone development 
 
Four primary purposes of the ECS include neuroprotection, stress recovery, immune balance, and homeostatic regulation. The last one is a fancy way of referring to a system that creates optimum energy balance in the body. 
 
Somehow, CBD seems to tap into this balancing system to produce its therapeutic effects. CBD is able to interact with cells in our bodies because the molecule has a similar composition to similar chemicals that the human body produces naturally, called endocannabinoids. It’s not often that a plant compound can make headlines over and over again. However, CBD is a phytocannabinoid with some serious life-saving potential.  

What is the difference between hemp oil and CBD Oil?

The main difference between CBD and Hemp Oil is that Hemp Oil does not always contain CBD.  Our CBD and hemp oils are made from different parts of the plant and have different purposes. CBD is a compound found in industrial hemp, and we utilize a whole plant CO2 extraction that allows us to draw the CBD from the plant material and filter out unnatural substances, maximizing pure CBD concentration. While CBD is extracted from the entire plant, minus the seeds, hemp is extracted only from the seeds. Hemp oil is made from pressing hemp seeds and is used in a variety of products. Hemp-seed oil is used as a protein supplement for food, as varnish for wood and, because of its remedial properties for hair and skin, as an ingredient in lotion and soap products. You can buy hemp-seed oil online or at certain food stores, where you can learn about more ways to incorporate it into your diet and hygiene. CBD oil is generally used for medicinal purposes and has shown great promise in treating inflammation, pain, sleeping disorders and even certain types of epileptic seizures.

Does CBD get you high?

Simple answer, no there is no high associated with taking our CBD.

CBD often gets mixed up with THC, which is another cannabinoid found in cannabis. CBD and THC are the two most abundant compounds found in cannabis. Yet, they have fundamentally different properties and benefits. THC, an intoxicating and illegal substance, is responsible for causing marijuana users to get “high.” Unlike THC, CBD does not cause a high. CBD is non-psychoactive because it does not act on the same pathways as THC. A 2011 review published in Current Drug Safety concludes that CBD “does not interfere with several psychomotor and psychological functions.” While CBD can be completely separated from THC and CBD cannot get you “high,” there is still a lot of stigma as many people tend to mistake the two compounds.

How do I take your CBD?

CBD tincture oil is one of the most effective ways to take any CBD product.

Simply dispense one dropper full (not one individual drop) under your tongue.  You can let it sit in your mouth for 10-15 seconds before swallowing for best results.  Take it morning or night, some people take it twice a day so it’s best to try it a few different ways and see what works best for you.

The dropper wand holds 1 mL of liquid and the bottles are 30 mL so one bottle is going to last you about one month if taken once daily.

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